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While the landmark Citizens United case concerned only the federal ban on the financing of election ads by corporations, the Supreme Court’s ruling implicitly struck down a host of similar state laws. That’s because the Court decided that a ban on political expenditures that are not coordinated with candidates or parties violates the U.S. Constitution.

States face similar fallout if the Supreme Court invalidates the two-year federal limit on aggregate contributions by individuals—a case we have written about here. At least 12 states impose aggregate (though often much lower) contribution limits on political contributions:

  • Arizona: individuals may give no more than $6,390 to all candidates or committees that give to candidates per calendar year.
  • Connecticut: individuals may give no more than $15,000 to all candidates for the primary and general elections together.
  • District of Columbia: individuals may give no more than $8,500 to all candidates per election cycle.
  • Louisiana: individuals may give no more than $100,000 to all non-candidate committee in a four-year cycle.
  • Maine: individuals may give no more than $25,000 to all candidate committees in Maine per year.
  • Maryland: individuals may give no more than $10,000 to all Maryland political committees in a four-year cycle.
  • Massachusetts: individuals may give no more than $12,500 to all state, county, and local candidates per year.
  • New York: individuals may give no more than $150,000 per calendar year to all registered New York political committees. Although corporations are allowed to contribute to non-federal candidates in New York State, they are subject to a yearly aggregate cap of $5,000.
  • Rhode Island: individuals may give no more than $10,000 per calendar year to all political committees.
  • Washington: during the 21 days before an election, there is an aggregate limit on individual contributions of $50,000 to statewide candidates and $5,000 in the aggregate to any other candidate or political committee.
  • Wisconsin: individuals may give no more than $10,000 per calendar year to all political committees.
  • Wyoming: individuals may give no more than $25,000 to all political committees during the year of the general election and the preceding calendar year.

Relatively few donors presently give the maximum allowed under the two-year federal limit. But if the far more modest limits imposed by state laws are overturned, the implications for state elections could be quite dramatic.