Alex Megaris focuses on complex regulatory investigations and government enforcement matters involving state attorneys general, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), state regulatory agencies, and the U.S. Congress. Alex also works closely with Venable's government affairs team in advocating for clients before these agencies. She has extensive experience with consumer protection laws, such as state unfair, deceptive and abusive practices (UDAAP) laws, the FTC Act, the Consumer Financial Protection Act, the FTC's Telemarketing Sales Rule, and product-specific regulations, including those regulating credit reporting, loan servicing, and debt collection.

Last week Qualcomm and New York State’s Comptroller, Thomas DiNapoli, announced that Qualcomm will begin posting its political spending on its website. In exchange, the NY Comptroller has agreed to drop the lawsuit it filed against the company.

As described here, last month the NY Comptroller sued Qualcomm on behalf of the state’s pension

We hope you will join us for a webinar on February 27 at 1:00, called Political Law 101. We will cover all the major topics you need to be thinking about as you ramp up for lobbying the new Congress and state legislatures, host site visits and other events, and prepare for the next election

The New York State comptroller filed a lawsuit against Qualcomm on behalf of the New York State pension fund, a major Qualcomm shareholder and the country’s third largest public institutional investor, seeking access to the company’s records to determine how it is spending corporate funds in the political arena.

According to the novel complaint, which

On December 11, New York’s attorney general revealed new regulations that would, if adopted, require nonprofit groups doing business in New York to disclose the percentage of total spending devoted to political activities in New York. The rules also would require groups that spend more than $10,000 to identify any donor giving $100 or more.

Americans for Responsible Leadership (“ARL”), a Phoenix-based nonprofit organization, disclosed its donors today in response to a ruling late yesterday from California’s highest court. The suit to enforce a new California disclosure regulation was filed by the state’s Fair Political Practices Commission (“FPPC”). According to the FPPC, the contribution was funneled to ARL from two

As a result of Citizens United and other cases decided in its wake, corporations and unions are now permitted to spend their own funds on ads advocating or opposing candidates, and other types of electoral communications. These court decisions, however, have not deterred critics from seeking ways of discouraging corporate political spending, primarily by compelling