Category Archives: Gift laws

Subscribe to Gift laws RSS Feed

Major Changes in Gift Rules Greet Trump Administration

With a new administration coming into office, there will be many changes in Washington. One less noticed change comes from the U.S. Office of Government Ethics (OGE) and will affect how you interact with new executive branch appointees and those career employees who stay on from the prior administration. OGE recently published amendments to the executive … Continue Reading

A Guide to Supporting the 2016 Presidential Nominating Conventions: From Hosting Events to Writing a Check

Thinking about sponsoring or hosting an event at the presidential nominating conventions in Cleveland and Philadelphia?  Or considering giving free items to attendees? Venable’s client alert summarizes recent guidance on convention events from the House and Senate ethics committees, and discusses both new and old ways that the national parties and the host cities are … Continue Reading

Don’t Forget: Recent FEC Case Is a Reminder That Federal Law Prohibits Contributions at the State and Local Levels Too

The Federal Election Commission recently concluded an investigation into contributions from a Canadian citizen to a candidate for governor. Why would the FEC investigate a state contribution? Because the ban on contributions from foreign nationals applies not just to federal candidates, but to state and local candidates as well. The FEC dismissed the case because … Continue Reading

Hosting Fundraisers: One Company’s Example of How Not to Do it

As we get closer and closer to the elections, candidates will be working harder and harder to raise money. One tried and true method is the fundraiser: an individual agrees to put together an event where his or her closest friends will make substantial contributions to the candidate, attend a breakfast, lunch, cocktails, or dinner, … Continue Reading

The Office of Government Ethics Proposes Changes to the Gift Rules: How the Changes Could Limit Interaction With Government Officials

The Office of Government Ethics (OGE) has proposed revisions to the gift rules for executive branch employees. Although some of the proposed changes are meant to bring clarity without changing the rules’ substance, several changes will result in new restrictions on the “gifts” that flow from day-to-day interactions companies and associations have with officials. Overall, … Continue Reading

Virginia Tightens the Reins: Major Lobbying and Gift Law Changes to Take Effect in 2016

Earlier this month, Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe signed into law a new bill making significant changes to Virginia’s lobbying and gift laws. The critical changes made by this bill, Senate Bill No. 1424, will become effective on January 1, 2016. Many of the revisions focus on gift reform, but the bill also contains important changes … Continue Reading

First Quarter LD-2 Reports Deadline Approaching

First quarter lobbying disclosure reports are due on Monday, April 20. This report, the LD-2, is where organizations report their expenses for federal lobbying efforts. The first quarter of a year is often a good time to evaluate your organization’s recordkeeping and processes for filling out the report and to determine what changes may need … Continue Reading

The Big No: Reimbursing Contributions

Over the last few years, the courts have loosened campaign finance laws and the agency charged with enforcing them is frequently gridlocked. However, one campaign finance violation that can still get you in big trouble is reimbursing contributions, particularly when the reimbursing is done by a corporation. In settling a recent enforcement matter involving the … Continue Reading

Virginia Enacts Statutory Gift Restrictions

As we described in a January 16 post, moments after being sworn in as Virginia’s 72nd governor on January 11, Governor McAuliffe signed an executive order imposing new gift restrictions on Executive Branch employees and officers and their immediate family members. The Executive Order applies only to individuals that work in Virginia’s Executive Branch. As expected, Virginia’s … Continue Reading

You Can Still Tune-Up on Government Affairs Compliance

        In case you missed our webinar last week on government affairs compliance, you can click here for the recording and here for the presentation materials. We covered topics including: Creative ways to be involved in the political process;  Operating a compliant PAC; Federal and state lobbying compliance; Pay-to-play laws that affect … Continue Reading

First Order of Business for Governor McAuliffe: Limits on Gifts to Public Officials

Virginia was one of the few states with no limits on gifts to public officials. However, in the wake of well-publicized gift scandals from the prior administration, just moments after being sworn in as Virginia’s 72nd governor on January 11, Governor McAuliffe signed an executive order imposing new gift restrictions on Executive Branch employees and … Continue Reading

Venable Hosts Webinar on Political Law Basics – February 27

We hope you will join us for a webinar on February 27 at 1:00, called Political Law 101. We will cover all the major topics you need to be thinking about as you ramp up for lobbying the new Congress and state legislatures, host site visits and other events, and prepare for the next election … Continue Reading

What Did You Intend by Paying for Dinner?

The D.C. Circuit issued its decision in United States v. Ring today, a case stemming from the Abramoff scandals. Kevin Ring, one of Jack Abramoff’s top lobbyists, was convicted of three counts of honest services fraud, one count of paying an illegal gratuity, and one conspiracy count. Honest Services Fraud: What Was in Your Head? The honest … Continue Reading

Government Contractors Face Growing Risks from Laws Regulating Political Contributions

The landmark Supreme Court ruling in the Citizens United case paved the way for explosive growth in political spending during the 2012 election cycle.  However, for government contractors and their principals, a growing number of “pay-to-play” laws restrict political contributions and fundraising, and can result in severe penalties, including the loss of contracts. Venable has … Continue Reading
LexBlog